6 People Skills to take from Retail to Health Care

  • Successfully communicating all the important facts to your patients in a way that they completely understand no matter what level of knowledge they may have or not have about biology or the medical profession.

In retail we have to relay our knowledge of our product or our store policies in a calm and respectful way that the customers can understand.  There are a range of customers that will feel affronted and you dumb it down to much, and then there are those that will be confused if you assume they know what you believe to be common knowledge.  Through customer engagement retail employees can learn to easily gauge by body language and facial expressions what their customers are taking in, and how their customers feel about the information.

  • Bedside manner is critical

As a retailer we must be mindful of our attitude and our manner of communicating what our customer doesn’t want to hear in a manner that will not break their loyalty.  You must be able to connect with and empathize with your customer, and show them that you do understand their frustrations. You must be able to exhibit to your customers that you are doing everything in your power to do.

  • Exhibit patience with difficult clients and their families that are already under stress or worry.

We encounter stressful situation with our customers when it comes to returns, poor product quality, high price points, or a misunderstanding in policy.  It is our job as retailers to ensure that we turn these sometimes stressful and aggravating moments into a positive shopping experience.

  • Express the importance and necessity of treatments that may want to be avoided.

On the sales floor we are sales people, we are experts in our field and we know how to express our expertise in such a way to our customers that they feel inclined to partake in our product or service.  Why is this warranty so important on their home heater?  How it will it prevent further drain on our finances and sustain a life long quality for our families?

  • Must appear open to listen with understanding the concerns of your patients.

I read often in retail blogs the annoyance one has in hearing any personal tid-bits about a customer’s life.   The fact remains we are all ego-centric at our core and we feel what we have to say is important, and allowing the customer to express their opinion, day, or strange occurrences only opens the safety net they feel in trusting you their local retailer.  This bond is important to maintain a steady and faithful customer base.

  • Attempting to respect and understand individual beliefs such as anti-vaccinations.

Customers will say crazy things, and we have to accept them for being unique in order to keep them happy and maintain their trust in us.  If we treat our customer as if they are freaks they will become reclusive and closed off to our suggestions and efforts to help them.  In most cases not return to our store for another visit.

Other Skills to Take from Retail

11 thoughts on “6 People Skills to take from Retail to Health Care

  1. ljaylj says:

    I received good customer service yesterday. I contacted a wireless phone company as I was quite upset because after 9 years some bozo (nothing against clowns in general) changed my plan when my wife went in to get a new phone. I let her know up front that I am upset but not to take it personally but if she couldn’t make things go back they way they were then I wanted to be transferred to the person who could. She said, I kid you not, “I understand, sir. I am a consumer as well as a company representative.” Disarmed me rather quickly. Customer service goes a long way in any profession. Good article btw.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Princess Kick-ass says:

    What an interesting cross-over. Hadn’t thought of it that way : D

    PS: Although I think anti-vaxers have serious problems in their heads, I do agree that we have to respect their choice. If they want their kids to die of measles, then by all means, let them.
    Mine will be safely protected by science, thank you very much. ^_-

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Josh Wrenn says:

    For once, I disagree. “Attempting to respect and understand individual beliefs such as anti-vaccinations.
    Customers will say crazy things, and we have to accept them for being unique in order to keep them happy and maintain their trust in us. If we treat our customer as if they are freaks they will become reclusive and closed off to our suggestions and efforts to help them. In most cases not return to our store for another visit.”

    Allowing anti-vaxxers into your practice is a danger to other patients. A few doctors in my area have a strict policy on vaccinations with the only exception being for medical reasons in order to protect everyone around them, and I applaud that and will only got to doctors who follow that policy. The greater good is more important than a few lost customers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • shopgirlanonymous says:

      Now I’m by no means and anti-vaccination believer…in fact although much of my family is, I grow incredibly frustrated with the growing number of unvaccinated children. But in the end the choice of the parents should not mean that these poor innocent children should go without any further medical attention when they are sick. Having worked in a medical office all through junior high and high school I see them not as a customer but a patient. Which may have affected my feelings towards my customers through college and beyond.

      But I can totally understand your concerns and your support for such a cause, just playing a little devil’s advocate.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Josh Wrenn says:

        I find it amazing that the same parents who distrust the doctors who want their children vaccinated go to them for help when they are sick. Maybe in ER’s or somewhere, but I don’t want those disease spawn anywhere near me.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. The Ranting Monkey says:

    “It is our job as retailers to ensure that we turn these sometimes stressful and aggravating moments into a positive shopping experience.”

    This is something that confuses a lot of retail workers. It does not mean just giving into the customer’s demands. Often times, clearly explaining a policy the customer misunderstood is enough to turn the experience positive.

    Liked by 1 person

      • The Ranting Monkey says:

        I am 6 months removed for a decade at Walmart where the line between doing what it takes to make the customer happy and just give it to them has been so blurred as to make customer service a catch phrase only. I could rant for days on the subject. I wish I had found your blog when I was still working there, this is real retail therapy.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. luciemuses says:

    Oh yes,
    it is very similar. Listening and explaining properly, and letting the client/patient feel valued. I used to train young doctors.
    I used to say ” Unless the patient has an IQ of under 70, if he/she does not understand your explanation, you are NOT explaining it well.

    Liked by 1 person

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